Satelit Merah Putih 2 Siap Beroperasi April 2024

SELESAISUDAH.com  Rakyat Merdeka – Satelit Merah Putih 2 milik TelkomGroup sukses meluncur ke orbit dari Cape Canaveral, Florida, Amerika Serikat, Selasa (20/2/2024). Rencana satelit tersebut akan mulai beroperasi pada April 2024.

“Sampai di final orbit 3 Maret, melakukan in orbit butuh waktu test 3-4 minggu. Satelit Merah Putih 2 akan siap digunakan awal April 2024,” kata Direktur Utama Telkom, Ririek Adriansyah, saat press conference Satelit Merah Putih 2 secara virtual Rabu (21/2/2024).

Menurut Ririek, satelit ini akan dimanfaatkan untuk membantu pemerataan digital di Indonesia melalui penyediaan layanan backhaul berbasis satelit, mengembangkan bisnis maritim di Indonesia, dan mendukung kedaulatan data dengan mengurangi kebergantungan kapasitas satelit asing.

Satelit Merah Putih 2 merupakan satelit ke-11 sekaligus satelit pertama TelkomGroup yang menggunakan teknologi High Throughput Satellite (HTS) atau yang juga dikenal dengan broadband satelit.  Satelit ini diluncurkan dengan roket Falcon 9 dan akan menempati slot orbit 113 derajat Bujur Timur (113 BT).

Direktur Wholesale & International Service Telkom, Bogi Witjaksono mengatakan, setidaknya ada tiga misi yang ingin dibawa Satelit Merah Putih 2. Yakni, meningkatkan ketahanan infrastuktur digital nasional untuk mendukung pemerataan konektivitas di seluruh Indonesia, mengamankan dan mempertahankan slot orbit Indonesia di 113 BT, serta memperkuat portofolio bisnis satelit melalui peningkatan kapasitas internal dari 10 Gbps (Satelit Telkom 3S dan Satelit Merah Putih) menjadi 42.4 Gbps.

Sementara, Direktur Utama Telkomsat, Lukman Hakim Abd Rauf menambahkan, teknologi HTS merupakan teknologi dengan desain cakupan area di bumi yang berukuran kecil namun banyak (multi-spots beam), sehingga mampu menghasilkan kekuatan pancar satelit yang besar di suatu area yang dilingkupi beam tersebut. Kekuatan pancar satelit ini identik dengan besaran data yang mampu dikirim satelit ke lokasi tersebut.

“Satelit broadband ini memungkinkan sumber daya frekuensi yang dapat digunakan berulang (frequency reuseable), sehingga hal ini berpotensi untuk menaikkan jumlah kapasitas yang dimiliki satelit HTS,” jelas Lukman.

Terkait dengan proses pemilihan mitra dan pengadaan satelit, Lukman menegaskan, hal tersebut telah dilakukan sesuai dengan asas kepatuhan (compliance) dan prinsip tata kelola perusahaan yang baik. Selain itu dari aspek bisnis, proses pemilihan mitra juga telah mempertimbangkan biaya per Gbps yang paling rendah sehingga menghasilkan satelit dengan kapasitas lebih besar dengan harga jual yang kompetitif.

Untuk diketahui, dengan kapasitas hingga 32Gbps, Satelit Merah Putih 2 membawa transponder aktif frekuensi C-band dan Ku-band, yang akan menjangkau seluruh area Indonesia. Sebagai negara di kawasan khatulistiwa yang memiliki curah hujan tinggi, satelit ini diharapkan dapat menjadi satelit HTS atau broadband satellite paling andal (reliable) di Indonesia. Hal ini dikarenakan kombinasi kedua frekuensi yang dimiliki di mana frekuensi C-Band adalah frekuensi yang memiliki performa paling baik terhadap curah hujan.https://kebayangkali.com/

Disability: Anglesey parents’ pledge to baby born without hand

Arthur Roberts
Image caption,Arthur Roberts from Anglesey was born without a lower left arm

By Sion Tootill & Heledd Sian

BBC News

The family of a baby boy born without a hand say they want to normalise limb differences for other children so they “never feel like they need to hide”.

Five-month-old Arthur Roberts from Anglesey was born without a lower left arm.

His parents Elliw Williams and Ilan Roberts, both 25, are planning an event bringing people like Arthur together.

They want to raise awareness of his condition and to “show Arthur that he’s not the only one”.

Ilan said: “We don’t want him to grow up to be ashamed of how he was born, or to be shy about it, or hiding it because that’s just the way he was born, just a little bit special.”

It was during the 20-week scan that Elliw and Ilan found out Arthur was missing his left hand.

“It was quite scary at first, we were a bit shocked,” says Ilan.

Elliw added, “It’s very lonely finding something like that out and not knowing anybody who’s been through it and not having someone to speak to.”

Arthur Roberts
Image caption,Arthur’s parents found out about his disability while they were still pregnant, but were relieved to know he was healthy and happy

But once the news sank in they described it as a relief knowing there was nothing more serious going on.

Ilan said: “After that 20-week scan the scans just stopped and it was from then on that we were able to enjoy the pregnancy. We said from the start that as long as he is healthy and happy then everything is OK.”

Over the next few months, the couple began to research the condition and noticed it was more common than they had thought.

Arthur Roberts being held by his mother father and older brother
Image caption,Arthur’s parents, with him and his brother, say it was a relief knowing there was nothing more serious once the news sank in

“I looked on things like Instagram and started to see more people who had something similar to Arthur. Being able to see other children living their lives normally, doing things like riding a bike, that’s helped us,” said Elliw.

Ilan added:”We just don’t want him to be left out or feel different to anyone else and seeing all these people who are like him and can do anything everyone else can do is great.”

Mollie Pearce, who reached the final of the hit BBC show The Traitors, used the platform to share her experience of living with a limb difference.

Mollie from Traitors
Image caption,Disability model Mollie Pearce reached the final of The Traitors

“I’ve kind of spent most of my life since I was 11 years old unwell,” she said on one episode of the show.

“I kind of wanted to advocate for people with a limb difference and a stoma,” she said.

“If I look at myself three years ago, I couldn’t even leave the house at points. So, to now be here running around with you guys is kind of crazy.”

Elliw and Ilan hope to host an event shortly bringing people like Arthur together from across north Wales.

“We want to help Arthur as much as we can because I imagine he’s going to need it one day and this will allow us to speak to other parents who have already been there and know some of the challenges we might face: things like tying his shoes or doing a zip which could be harder for him,” said Ilan.

“We also want to be able to support others.

“And hopefully there’s someone nearer Arthur’s age who we meet through this event. Someone he can be friends with, and that he can talk to about things that are difficult,” he added.

Despite receiving support from charities, both feel more needs to be done to support children like Arthur.

Ilan said: Nobody can give us a reason to explain why this happened.”

Elliw added: “We didn’t get enough support. They didn’t give us a name on the condition, we still don’t have one really.”

In a statement the head of midwifery at Liverpool Women’s Hospital said, “Our team of experts always aim to support families during diagnostic tests.”

They added: “Any ongoing support following a diagnosis should be requested and provided via the main provider of a person’s care in the first instance.”https://cekikikan.com/

Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board was asked to comment.

Great Nicobar: Indian president visits island as fears grow for tribe

President Droupadi Murmu visited Indira Point, the southernmost tip of the country
Image caption,President Droupadi Murmu was shown a presentation on Great Nicobar’s strategic importance

By Flora Drury

BBC News

India’s president has made a whistle stop tour of an island earmarked for multi-billion dollar development that experts warn could wipe out the indigenous tribe which calls it home.

Droupadi Murmu visited Great Nicobar on Tuesday – a remote island Indian officials hope will be transformed into a shipping hub and tourist destination.

The government says the plans will unleash the region’s potential.

But experts say it would be a “death sentence” for the Shompen people.

In a letter sent to President Murmu earlier this month, 39 experts warned the scheme turning the southern part of Great Nicobar into the “Hong Kong of India” would result in the Shompen “fac[ing] genocide”.

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But while the letter made headlines around the world, there were fears it had failed to make the government reconsider its plans. Importantly, President Murmu is the head of the state, but does not exercise executive powers.

“If President Murmu’s visit signals the government’s determination to push through the Great Nicobar mega-project, it is a death knell for the indigenous Shompen people,” warned Callum Russell, spokesperson from Survival International.

According to Survival International, the Shompen – who number between 100 and 400 people – are nomadic hunter gatherers who live in the island’s rainforest. They are one of five “particularly vulnerable” tribes across the Nicobar and Andaman islands chain, but the only one on Great Nicobar.

Very few of the Shompen have ever had contact with the outside world, in part helped by the fact just another 8,000 people live on Great Nicobar, which is hundreds of kilometres east of India in the Indian Ocean.

Shompen make their way through a river
Image caption,The Shompen are hunter gatherers, so cover vast areas

However, the government’s $9bn (£6bn) scheme envisages as many as 650,000 people will end up on the island after the town, shipping port, international airport and power plant are built.

The island’s location, it argues, puts it in the perfect spot to take advantage of the international shipping trade – not to mention a good position to challenge China’s growing influence in the region.

A promotional video shared by India’s Ministry of Ports, Shipping and Waterways includes images of skyscrapers rising up behind the new port, as well as what appear to be large holiday developments.

The video says the shipping port and other parts will improve “quality of life for current and future residents of Great Nicobar”.

But these new plans, Survival says, will not only eat into the lands the Shompen live and hunt in, but also increase the risk of contact with other people.

An image of how the new port will look
Image caption,A still showing what the new scheme could look like

Any contact at all could destroy the tribe. In their letter, the experts, led by Dr Mark Levene, of the University of Southampton, warned that “simple contact… is certain to result in a precipitous population collapse” because the Shompen have “little to no immunity to infectious outside diseases”.

And even if contact did not happen, the impact of the development on the group could result in a “collective psychic breakdown”.

Even the government’s own report acknowledges “any disturbance or alteration in the natural environmental setup where they live, may cause serious threat to their existence”.

Despite these fears – and warnings from other groups over not only the Shompen, but also the potential damage the island’s unique ecology – the government is expected to push ahead with the scheme later this year.

Mr Russell told the BBC they were continuing to call on the “deadly project” to be abandoned in order to save the Shompen.

“There is simply no way they will survive this catastrophic transformation of the island – the only home they have ever known. And the authorities have been clearly warned that this is the inevitable result,” he told the BBC.https://sukaati.com/

The strangers who saved each other’s lives

Marius (left) with Nick (right)
Image caption,Marius (left) with Nick (right)

By Sharon Barbour and Natalie Wright

BBC News

With an anonymous stem-cell donation, Marius Werner saved a British doctor’s life – and, the young German says, it may have saved him too, giving him purpose when he had felt suicidal.

With a rare type of blood cancer, Dr Nick Embleton’s only hope was a bone-marrow transplant.

And unable to find a match in the UK, the search was extended worldwide.

Two years on, BBC News and charity Anthony Nolan help two “blood brothers” find each other for the first time.

‘Might die’

For more than two decades, Nick has worked in Newcastle’s neonatal intensive-care unit, helping to save thousands of the world’s smallest patients.

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But in 2021, he needed a doctor himself.

Walking down the hospital corridors, he says he “had no idea what was about to unfold”.

“I was fully aware I might die, so I made a will,” he says.

“I broke this news to my wife and my kids.

“I felt saddest for my kids – I didn’t want them to grow up the rest of their lives without their dad.”

Marius donating
Image caption,Marius giving his life-saving donation

A bone-marrow transplant replaces damaged blood cells with healthy ones – but the body automatically rejects them unless they match.

Charlotte Hughes, from the Anthony Nolan charity, said: “We search the UK register first and hopefully find a match here.

“If we are unable to, then Anthony Nolan search worldwide to find a match.

“A match could come from anywhere.”

‘Very overwhelmed’

Both donor and patient must remain anonymous until the transplant is known to have worked

As soon as he learned it had, after two years, Nick told BBC News he wanted to track down his donor.

Working with Anthony Nolan, BBC News identified Marius, 24, of Chemniz, near Dresden, who had been on the donor register since his late teens.

And he agreed to fly to the UK and meet Nick, at Maggie’s Newcastle cancer-support centre, at the Freeman Hospital, where he had his transplant.

As the two men hug, Marius says: “I’m very overwhelmed – I’m shaking.”

‘You’re welcome’

Nick tells him: “The cancer cells have all gone.

“When they check my blood, all of those blood cells belong to you.

“I would be dead if it wasn’t for you.

“I’ve got four children – they wouldn’t have their dad.

“I mean I just really want to say, ‘Thank you.'”

Lost for words, an emotional Marius manages: “You’re welcome.”

And with tears now running down both their faces, Nick whispers to him: “Thank you so much.”

‘Tears come’

Later, Marius recalls learning the transplant had worked – and the patient survived.

“After that information, only the tears come,” he says.

“I was on the way to my work and I had to park my car and get out and need fresh air – tears came out.”

Then, Marius reveals he had previously tried to kill himself and how – in a way – Nick had helped save him.

“I struggled my whole life since I was 13 with mental issues,” he says.

“It’s [been] hard for me to find my way in life – and my sense in life.

“[Now,] I can say, ‘I did something right.'”

And with the same blood running through their veins, the two strangers are now planning to remain in touch as “blood brothers”.https://kebayangkali.com/

Soal AHY Dilantik Jadi Menteri ATR, Demokrat: Jika Negara Memanggil, Siap!

SELESAISUDAH.com  Rakyat Merdeka – Ketua Umum Partai Demokrat Agus Harimurti Yudhoyono (AHY) dikabarkan akan dilantik sebagai Menteri Agraria dan Tata Ruang/Kepala Badan Pertanahan Nasional (ATR/BPN) pada Rabu, 21 Februari 2024. Menanggapi kabar tersebut, Koordinator Juru Bicara Partai Demokrat Herzaky Mahendra Putra mengatakan, jika negara memanggil, AHY siap melaksanakan tugas. 

Herzaky mengatakan, reshuffle kabinet hak adalah prerogatif Presiden. Partainya menghormati betul hak Presiden. “Jadi, apakah akan ada pelantikan menteri, lalu siapa menterinya, tentu beliaulah yang tahu. Silahkan ditanyakan kepada beliau,” kata Herzaky, kepada RM.id, Selasa (20/2/2024). 

Herzaky menambahkan, jika negara memanggil, Mas AHY siap memenuhi panggilan tugas dari negara. 

“Namanya prajurit, beliau selalu mendarmabaktikan hidupnya untuk bangsa dan negara. Dulu di militer, lalu sekarang di medan politik. Ke depan, tentu beliau selalu siap memenuhi panggilan tugas untuk bangsa dan negara,” paparnya.

Dikonfirmasi terpisah, Anggota Majelis Tinggi Partai Demokrat Syarief Hasan tak membantah terkait kabar tersebut. “Semoga ya, kita tunggu saja,” kata Syarief. 

Sebelumnya, Anggota Komisi II DPR Guspardi Gaus mengaku mendapat informasi AHY akan mengisi posisi Menteri ATR/BPN. Sementara, menurut kabar yang beredar, Hadi Tjahjanto akan dilantik menjadi Menko Polhukam yang sebelumnya diisi oleh Mahfud MD. “Mengapa AHY? Karena sekarang ini sudah bagian daripada pemerintahan Jokowi mendukung paslon nomor urut 2,” kata Guspardi.

Menurut dia, wajar bila Presiden Jokowi memberikan kesempatan kepada AHY untuk duduk di kursi Kabinet Indonesia Maju. “Ini adalah hak prerogatif presiden,” katanya.

Presiden Jokowi tak berkomentar panjang lebar mengenai kabar akan melantik AHY. “Besok ditunggu jam 10.00 WIB,” kata Jokowi kepada wartawan di Ecovention Ancol, Jakarta Utara, Selasa (20/2/2024).https://kebayangkali.com/

Bollywood meets Beyoncé: ‘Brown artists can be mainstream too’

Club event
Image caption,The south Asian underground music scene is rapidly growing

By Yasmin Rufo

BBC News

Scroll through TikTok or go for a night out at the weekend and you could easily be left with the impression that South Asian music is booming. But despite seemingly being so popular, it is struggling to make an impact on the mainstream.

It is a Saturday night in a club in west London, and sounds, cultures and beats are being fused together by South Asian DJs who are going head-to-head in a musical showdown.

“This isn’t just music, this is a celebration of my culture and identity,” one young man shouts over the music.

As revellers dance to remixes of global chart-toppers, iconic Bollywood songs, bhangra beats and a whole host of other sounds, DJ D-lish says she is “pushing the boundary of what south Asian music means”.

The 25-year-old, real name Alisha, is just one of many South Asian artists trying to make their music mainstream.

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Despite an underground music scene that has a cult-like following, Asian artists continue to grapple with the challenge of breaking into the charts. This is despite the fact that almost 10% of the British population are Asian.

While other musical subcultures such as Grime are having their heyday, Asian-influenced music seems to have been left behind.

In 2002, Panjabi MC released his bhangra hit Mundian To Bach Ke. It sold 10 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling singles of all time.

However, what could have been the start of a boom for Asian artists turned out to be little more than a one-hit wonder.

Two decades on, the problem persists – only a handful of British Asian artists have had top 40 singles and even fewer songs with an Asian-influenced sound have made it into the charts.

‘Judged before I opened my mouth’

Singer-songwriter Jay Sean tells BBC News that “people were confused” when he first started performing in the early 2000s.

“They would see a brown kid and immediately assume what kind of music I was about to play, I would be judged before I even opened my mouth,” he explains.

Jay Sean
Image caption,Jay Sean said people would always make assumptions about his music based on the way he looked

Best known for his 2009 hit Down, the British Asian R&B artist said even after he signed to a label, he would be asked “dumb questions” because there was “a lot of ignorance around South Asian culture and label producers didn’t always get it”.

Musician Naughty Boy, who has worked with Emeli Sande and Sam Smith, told the BBC he had a similar experience of being “put in a box because I was brown and Muslim”.

The artist, who had a UK number one hit with La La La and five additional UK top 10s, said he had previously been told to “dilute” his sound to “make it more mainstream and increase the chances of it charting”. He said he resisted doing so and has always been “unapologetic” with his music.

Both artists have different stage names to their actual names, but say that this is not to hide their heritage.

Naughty Boy
Image caption,Naughty Boy has been making music for over a decade

“I didn’t want to prove myself through my identity, so I use the name to not attract attention. I want the world to hear my music without judgement,” Naughty Boy says.

He and Jay Sean have set up their own record labels to give a platform to up-and-coming South Asian talent.

“I’m not going to rest until I see more South Asian artists being played on mainstream platforms – if Spanish music and Afrobeats can be mainstream for a British audience then our music can as well,” says Sean.

‘The media turns a blind eye’

As the South Asian underground music scene continues to expand, record labels are tapping into its popularity and a greater commitment is being made to sign South Asian artists.

Vishal Patel is the co-founder of 91+, an independent label that was created “to fill a void” and exclusively signs artists of South Asian heritage.

He suggests South Asian artists are struggling to become mainstream because “of the lack of infrastructure”.

“There are so few media executives who are of South Asian heritage that can operationally help us push this music. Most execs don’t understand our culture so they choose to ignore it,” he explains.

“It was like this once for black British artists, but they were able to come together and break through – it’s the labels, media and streaming services that have made Grime music cool. We need people in the industry who will champion South Asian musicians.”

Club event
Image caption,Music executives are using social media as a tool to find up-and-coming South Asian artists

Jasmine Takhar, a presenter of the BBC’s Introducing show on the Asian Network has given a platform to more than 500 South Asian artists on her show.

She believes that there is an “ignorance” around the type of music that South Asian artists make.

“The talent is definitely there,” she tells the BBC, “but how often do you hear South Asian artists on the radio or promoted on Spotify?”

Takhar adds that she has come across acts with millions of followers on social media but have barely any presence in the mainstream because “the media turns a blind eye”.

A new Asian sound

One group who has found social media fame is girl band Girls Like You, who were scouted on Instagram by Vishal’s record label.

Comprised of four women aged between 20 and 25 who are all of South Asian Heritage, the band have gone viral multiple times on Instagram and TikTok.

Girls Like You
Image caption,Girls Like You make music in English, Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi

Most recently the girl group had six million views on a remix of Bollywood’s Yeh Ka Hua and Ne-Yo’s R&B classic So Sick.

They say their music is a “fusion of cultures that mix languages and sounds”.

“We love to throw together pop music with bhangra,” explains band member Jaya. “It’s like mixing Bollywood and Beyoncé.”

Sampling Bollywood music is not a new concept in western music – many well-known pop songs have used snippets from India’s largest film industry.

Britney Spears’ Toxic sampled a 1981 Hindi song by Lata Mangeshkar, while the Black Eyed Peas sampled a famous song by Asha Bhosle in Don’t Phunk with My Heart.

Yasmin, another of the band’s members, said the group are “breaking down stereotypes of what it means to be a British Asian woman” and have a “completely global” following on social media.

They are hoping they will be able to turn their social media success into chart-topping hits, and they feel confident that now is the time for South Asian artists.

As well as social media helping artists grow, music festivals are also making an effort to increase the diversity of their line-ups.

Diljit Dosanjh performs on stage during the Born To Shine World Tour in Vancouver in June 2022
Image caption,Diljit Singh Dosanjh will be the first Punjabi language singer to perform at Coachella

Coachella’s 2024 line-up has been praised for its South Asian representation, with the likes of Mercury prize nominee Joy Crookes – who’s from South London and is half Bangladeshi – performing.

She previously told the BBC that it was very important for musicians from minority groups be given a “platform”.

Singer Diljit Dosanjh, the first turban-wearing actor to lead a Bollywood movie and the first Punjabi artist to sell out the O2 Arena in London, will also perform at the festival.

However, while steps are being taken to reflect South Asian music’s increasing popularity, Naughty Boy is wary that the music industry’s commitment is not seen as a “phase”.

“I don’t want labels to throw money at South Asian artists because it’s cool to be brown right now,” he says.

“I’m brown forever, not a minute, so while it’s refreshing to see this, we need a long-term commitment to change the landscape.”https://kebayangkali.com/

Bey Pastikan Stok Beras di Jabar Aman Terkendali

SELESAISUDAH.com  Rakyat Merdeka – Penjabat Gubernur Jawa Barat Bey Machmudin memastikan cadangan beras di Bulog masih aman terkendali tinggal didistribusikan secara merata ke tempat-tempat penjualan beras di seluruh wilayah Jabar.

“Jadi masyarakat tak perlu khawatir, tinggal masalah pasokan saja ke tempat-tempat penjualan beras,” ucap Bey saat ditemui di kantor Dinas Bina Marga dan Penataan Ruang (DBMPR) Provinsi Jabar, Kota Bandung, Senin (19/2/2024).

Meskipun demikian, Bey meminta ASN Pemda Provinsi Jawa Barat yang berada di lingkungan Dinas Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura Jabar untuk berinovasi agar stok beras tidak mengalami penurunan.

“Saya minta Dinas Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura Jabar mencari inovasi baru untuk ke depannya karena Jawa Barat itu salah satu sentral produksi beras di Tanah Air,” ujarnya.

“Jangan sampai terjadi penurunan,” tegas Bey.

Selain mengunjungi Distanhor Jabar, Bey juga berkunjung ke DBMPR Jabar untuk memberikan suntikan semangat kepada ASN agar terus bekerja lebih baik lagi.

“Saya tadi ke Dinas Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura, kemudian ke Dinas Bina Marga dan Penataan Ruang, tujuannya saya ingin menyemangati para pegawai untuk bekerja dengan baik,” tuturnya.

Dia pun meyakini bahwa pegawai ASN Pemda Provinsi Jabar mempunyai kualitas mumpuni di tiap bidang keilmuannya masing-masing.

“Karena saya yakin bahwa ASN Pemprov Jabar ini yang terbaik di bidangnya. Jadi saya menyemangati supaya mereka bekerja lebih baik dan giat lagi,” pungkas Bey.https://kebayangkali.com/

Bollywood meets Beyoncé: ‘Brown artists can be mainstream too’

Club event
Image caption,The south Asian underground music scene is rapidly growing

By Yasmin Rufo

BBC News

Scroll through TikTok or go for a night out at the weekend and you could easily be left with the impression that South Asian music is booming. But despite seemingly being so popular, it is struggling to make an impact on the mainstream.

It is a Saturday night in a club in west London, and sounds, cultures and beats are being fused together by South Asian DJs who are going head-to-head in a musical showdown.

“This isn’t just music, this is a celebration of my culture and identity,” one young man shouts over the music.

As revellers dance to remixes of global chart-toppers, iconic Bollywood songs, bhangra beats and a whole host of other sounds, DJ D-lish says she is “pushing the boundary of what south Asian music means”.

The 25-year-old, real name Alisha, is just one of many South Asian artists trying to make their music mainstream.

ADVERTISEMENT

Despite an underground music scene that has a cult-like following, Asian artists continue to grapple with the challenge of breaking into the charts. This is despite the fact that almost 10% of the British population are Asian.

While other musical subcultures such as Grime are having their heyday, Asian-influenced music seems to have been left behind.

In 2002, Panjabi MC released his bhangra hit Mundian To Bach Ke. It sold 10 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling singles of all time.

However, what could have been the start of a boom for Asian artists turned out to be little more than a one-hit wonder.

Two decades on, the problem persists – only a handful of British Asian artists have had top 40 singles and even fewer songs with an Asian-influenced sound have made it into the charts.

‘Judged before I opened my mouth’

Singer-songwriter Jay Sean tells BBC News that “people were confused” when he first started performing in the early 2000s.

“They would see a brown kid and immediately assume what kind of music I was about to play, I would be judged before I even opened my mouth,” he explains.

Jay Sean
Image caption,Jay Sean said people would always make assumptions about his music based on the way he looked

Best known for his 2009 hit Down, the British Asian R&B artist said even after he signed to a label, he would be asked “dumb questions” because there was “a lot of ignorance around South Asian culture and label producers didn’t always get it”.

Musician Naughty Boy, who has worked with Emeli Sande and Sam Smith, told the BBC he had a similar experience of being “put in a box because I was brown and Muslim”.

The artist, who had a UK number one hit with La La La and five additional UK top 10s, said he had previously been told to “dilute” his sound to “make it more mainstream and increase the chances of it charting”. He said he resisted doing so and has always been “unapologetic” with his music.

Both artists have different stage names to their actual names, but say that this is not to hide their heritage.

Naughty Boy
Image caption,Naughty Boy has been making music for over a decade

“I didn’t want to prove myself through my identity, so I use the name to not attract attention. I want the world to hear my music without judgement,” Naughty Boy says.

He and Jay Sean have set up their own record labels to give a platform to up-and-coming South Asian talent.

“I’m not going to rest until I see more South Asian artists being played on mainstream platforms – if Spanish music and Afrobeats can be mainstream for a British audience then our music can as well,” says Sean.

‘The media turns a blind eye’

As the South Asian underground music scene continues to expand, record labels are tapping into its popularity and a greater commitment is being made to sign South Asian artists.

Vishal Patel is the co-founder of 91+, an independent label that was created “to fill a void” and exclusively signs artists of South Asian heritage.

He suggests South Asian artists are struggling to become mainstream because “of the lack of infrastructure”.

“There are so few media executives who are of South Asian heritage that can operationally help us push this music. Most execs don’t understand our culture so they choose to ignore it,” he explains.

“It was like this once for black British artists, but they were able to come together and break through – it’s the labels, media and streaming services that have made Grime music cool. We need people in the industry who will champion South Asian musicians.”

Club event
Image caption,Music executives are using social media as a tool to find up-and-coming South Asian artists

Jasmine Takhar, a presenter of the BBC’s Introducing show on the Asian Network has given a platform to more than 500 South Asian artists on her show.

She believes that there is an “ignorance” around the type of music that South Asian artists make.

“The talent is definitely there,” she tells the BBC, “but how often do you hear South Asian artists on the radio or promoted on Spotify?”

Takhar adds that she has come across acts with millions of followers on social media but have barely any presence in the mainstream because “the media turns a blind eye”.

A new Asian sound

One group who has found social media fame is girl band Girls Like You, who were scouted on Instagram by Vishal’s record label.

Comprised of four women aged between 20 and 25 who are all of South Asian Heritage, the band have gone viral multiple times on Instagram and TikTok.

Girls Like You
Image caption,Girls Like You make music in English, Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi

Most recently the girl group had six million views on a remix of Bollywood’s Yeh Ka Hua and Ne-Yo’s R&B classic So Sick.

They say their music is a “fusion of cultures that mix languages and sounds”.

“We love to throw together pop music with bhangra,” explains band member Jaya. “It’s like mixing Bollywood and Beyoncé.”

Sampling Bollywood music is not a new concept in western music – many well-known pop songs have used snippets from India’s largest film industry.

Britney Spears’ Toxic sampled a 1981 Hindi song by Lata Mangeshkar, while the Black Eyed Peas sampled a famous song by Asha Bhosle in Don’t Phunk with My Heart.

Yasmin, another of the band’s members, said the group are “breaking down stereotypes of what it means to be a British Asian woman” and have a “completely global” following on social media.

They are hoping they will be able to turn their social media success into chart-topping hits, and they feel confident that now is the time for South Asian artists.

As well as social media helping artists grow, music festivals are also making an effort to increase the diversity of their line-ups.

Diljit Dosanjh performs on stage during the Born To Shine World Tour in Vancouver in June 2022
Image caption,Diljit Singh Dosanjh will be the first Punjabi language singer to perform at Coachella

Coachella’s 2024 line-up has been praised for its South Asian representation, with the likes of Mercury prize nominee Joy Crookes – who’s from South London and is half Bangladeshi – performing.

She previously told the BBC that it was very important for musicians from minority groups be given a “platform”.

Singer Diljit Dosanjh, the first turban-wearing actor to lead a Bollywood movie and the first Punjabi artist to sell out the O2 Arena in London, will also perform at the festival.

However, while steps are being taken to reflect South Asian music’s increasing popularity, Naughty Boy is wary that the music industry’s commitment is not seen as a “phase”.

“I don’t want labels to throw money at South Asian artists because it’s cool to be brown right now,” he says.

“I’m brown forever, not a minute, so while it’s refreshing to see this, we need a long-term commitment to change the landscape.”https://kebayangkali.com/

Kunjungi Booth PLN di IIMS, Penggiat Otomotif Sebut Infrastruktur EV Kian Masif

SELESAISUDAH.com  Rakyat Merdeka – Gelaran Indonesia Internasional Motor Show (IIMS) 2024 yang berlangsung sejak 15-25 Februari di JIEXPO Kemayoran Jakarta, menjadi ajang bagi PT PLN (Persero) mengakselerasi ekosistem kendaraan listrik kepada masyarakat.

Hal tersebut diakui oleh salah seorang penggiat otomotif bernama Atenx Katros.

Usai berkunjung ke booth PLN, dirinya mengaku terkesima dengan perkembangan infrastruktur kendaraan listrik di tanah air yang semakin masif.

“Cukup kaget juga ya, ternyata PLN ini sudah menyiapkan infrastruktur untuk kendaraan listrik, terutama untuk motor listrik yang nggak cuma satu-dua jenis tapi memang cukup masif dan merata gitu ya, ada di semua bagian Indonesia,” kata Atenx.

Hadir melalui booth bertema The Future Lifestle Experience, PLN menunjukkan beragam keunggulan kendaraan listrik dan fasilitas layanan charging yang tersedia saat ini.

Dengan kesiapan infrastruktur yang sangat matang dari PLN tersebut, Atenx merasa yakin, makin banyak masyarakat yang akan beralih menggunakan kendaraan listrik.

Karena, selain mampu menekan angka polusi, kendaraan listrik juga banyak memiliki banyak keunggulan.

“Karena sebelumnya agak-agak ragu, tapi di tahun ini lebih trust sama motor listrik dan infrastruktur pendukungnya. Gue harapin, nggak cuma gue doang tapi masyarakat juga bisa mulai untuk menggunakan motor listrik. Supaya menekan angka polusi dan lebih enak juga,” kata Atenx.

Terlebih, kata Atenx, tidak hanya ramah lingkungan, kendaraan listrik juga memiliki keunggulan yaitu lebih hemat dan murah perawatannya.

“Ya, kelebihan motor listrik itu sudah pasti lebih irit ya, karena menggunakan baterai. Selain itu perawatannya juga sangat murah karena tidak menggunakan oli dan lain-lain gitu,” ujar Atenx.

Pada kesempatan terpisah, Direktur Utama PLN Darmawan Prasodjo mengatakan bahwa pihaknya berkomitmen penuh dalam mendorong ekosistem kendaraan listrik mulai dari infrastruktur hingga layanan penunjang.

Ketersediaan infrastruktur EV ini diyakini akan mendorong masyarakat semakin yakin beralih ke kendaraan listrik.

“Kami sudah sangat siap dalam hal infrastruktur kendaraan listrik, PLN telah memasok listrik andal bagi 1.124 Stasiun Pengisian Kendaraan Listrik Umum (SPKLU) dan 1.839 Stasiun Penukaran Baterai Kendaraan Listrik Umum (SPBKLU) yang tersebar di 776 lokasi seluruh Indonesia untuk melayani masyarakat,” ungkap Darmawan.

Selain itu, Darmawan menegaskan, saat ini masyarakat juga diberi kemudahan dalam memiliki kendaraan listrik melalui super app PLN Mobile.

Melalui fitur Electric Vehicle Digital Services (EVDS) di dalamnya, PLN memberikan kemudahan pelanggan dalam memenuhi segala kebutuhan kendaraan listrik dalam satu platform.

Sehingga, tidak hanya sebagai tempat transaksi pembelian token listrik, PLN Mobile juga bisa menjadi opsi bagi masyarakat untuk penambahan daya, pemasangan baru, bahkan pembelian kendaraan listrik.

Saat ini kata Darmawan, masyarakat tidak perlu jauh-jauh datang ke showroom untuk melihat kendaraan listrik yang ingin mereka beli, tinggal membuka aplikasi PLN Mobile, semuanya telah tersedia.

“Mulai dari pembelian token listrik, informasi tentang lokasi SPKLU, SPBKLU, dan SPLU terdekat hingga pembelian kendaraan listrik pun ada,” pungkas Darmawan.https://kebayangkali.com/

West Bank Palestinians paying the price for Gaza war

Kamal Karaja with his daughters
Image caption,Kamal Karaja was working on a construction site in Israel before the war

By Alaa Daraghme & Eman Eriqat

BBC Arabic, Ramallah

Kamal Karaja used to earn $3,500 (£2,780; €3,250) a month working on construction sites in Israel – a good living for a Palestinian in the occupied West Bank.

But after the Hamas assault on Israel on 7 October, and the retaliatory Israeli air strikes and ground invasion of the Gaza Strip, his permit was cancelled. Israel cited “security concerns”.

“I waited for the war to end but it’s still ongoing,” says the 32-year-old, from the town of Deir Bzi, just outside Ramallah.

“I had to sell my car after a month due to money problems.”

The Palestinian Authority (PA) says 200,000 workers are affected, mostly in the West Bank.

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Kamal says his three-year-old daughter Zeina “notices that I’m not buying as much food and vegetables for the house as before”.

“She asks me why I no longer buy her chocolate and crisps.”

Hundreds of men in Kamal’s town are sitting at home for the same reason – and the economy has ground to a halt.

After months of job-seeking, Kamal got two weeks’ work on a construction site in the West Bank.

But his employer had to lay him off due to the worsening financial situation.

He has now started cutting down trees and selling firewood to local residents.

“Selling firewood is worth 2% of the salary I used to get from working in Israel,” says Kamal.

An Israeli checkpoint
Image caption,Israeli checkpoints used to be crammed with Palestinian workers waiting to cross into Israel

He did not receive any compensation from the authorities or his employer when his permit was cancelled.

Like many other Palestinian workers, he was employed without a contract.

Foreign worker campaign

Palestinians working in Israel – and those working in Israeli settlements in the West Bank – accounted for nearly one in five of all Palestinian workers before 7 October, according to official Palestinian figures.

Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank are considered illegal under international law, though Israel disputes this.

The workers contributed $3.2bn annually to the Palestinian economy, with most employed in construction.

While some Israeli business groups lobbied for Palestinian workers to be allowed back, the government has come up with a different plan.

It wants to replace Palestinian workers and plans to admit more than 60,000 workers from India, China, Moldova, Sri Lanka and Thailand this year.

The head of the Palestinian General Federation of Trade Unions, Shaher Saad, has criticised Israel’s decision.

“There were about 105,000 Palestinians working in construction in Israel,” Mr Saad told BBC Arabic, adding that they were all unemployed now.

“The agreements between Palestinian and Israeli unions force employers to pay compensation to workers due to the cessation of work.

“But the Israeli employers evade paying their dues and there is no law in Israel that forces them to do so.”

Mr Saad added that it would be “unrealistic and difficult” to replace the expertise of Palestinian workers in the construction, agriculture, tourism and service sectors.

Electricity and water cuts

Bassam Karaja (no relation), a Palestinian father-of-four from Ramallah, has also found himself forced into poverty after his work permit was cancelled.

He can no longer afford to pay his bills, so his electricity and water have been cut off.

“I was never late in paying the electricity and water company while I was working in Israel these past 10 years,” says Bassam.

“But when I stopped working, they stopped their service.”

Ramallah
Image caption,Ramallah in the West Bank – the headquarters of the Palestinian Authority

Bassam used to earn $4,000 per month while working in Israel.

He says the past four months have been the worst since the Covid pandemic, where he was at least able to work part-time.

Bassam accuses the Palestinian Authority, led by President Mahmoud Abbas, of neglecting workers, and says they could have provided financial aid or at least stopped the utility firms withdrawing their services.

Since the start of the war, the unemployment rate in the Palestinian territories has jumped from 23% to 47%.

The Palestinian economy has also contracted by 35%, according to Labour Minister Nasri Abu Jeish.

Mr Jeish said the PA had asked donor countries and the International Labour Organisation for help but “they haven’t heard back yet”.

The Palestinian Authority was already suffering financially before the war, but now it is even worse.

Israel collects tax revenues on behalf of the PA, worth about $188m per month.

This money is used by the PA to pay civil servant salaries and fund public services in both Gaza and the West Bank.

As a sign of the growing crisis, the PA only paid staff their December salary a few days ago, at a reduced rate of 60%.

It’s estimated that the PA spends about 30% of its budget in Gaza, even though Hamas has run the territory since 2007.

Israel said in November that it would not allow any money to go to Hamas in Gaza, stripping this funding out.

The PA refused to receive the reduced tax revenues from Israel, forcing it to cut salaries.

There seems to be no end in sight.

“We thank God that we are still able to provide food and water to our families,” says Kamal.

“The butcher understands my situation because he’s a relative – but I can only last another month.”https://kebayangkali.com/